Population

A better understanding of the scale of domestic abuse during the pandemic

Pictured is a victim of domestic violence

The Office for National Statistics has been working to bring together data sources to provide the best understanding of the scale of domestic abuse, sexual offences and violence against women and girls. However, the impact of the pandemic on survey collection has meant a data gap in understanding the sheer prevalence of these crimes. The ONS has now published its first estimates of domestic abuse and sexual assault in two years. Meghan Elkin explains why a note of caution should be taken in interpreting these statistics.

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Ukraine crisis: How the ONS has responded to the need for better information

Picture of Ukraine flag

The Office for National Statistics produces statistics to support better decisions. In this blog Liz McKeown explains how we are collecting data as quickly as possible to assist people who come from Ukraine to help understand the support and services they need.

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Transforming the way we produce population statistics

Picture of busy crowds in London

The census gives us a brilliant, detailed snapshot of England and Wales, but since census day the world has continued to change. People move home, change jobs, some will have left the country while others will have arrived. Reflecting these ongoing changes, Jen Woolford explains how the ONS is using a variety of data sources to provide more frequent, inclusive, and timely statistics to allow us to understand population change in local areas this year and beyond.

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Who is paying for their own community care?

Image of a nurse visiting an elderly lady in her home

Last week’s first results from the England and Wales 2021 Census revealed, we are an increasingly ageing population. Nearly one in five of us (18.6%) – an estimated 11.1 million people – were aged 65 years and over in 2021.  Inevitably, this means that more people will require care, often in their own home.  Here, the ONS’s Head of Social Care Analysis, Dr Sophie John, explains the challenges of finding out how many people are paying for care in their own home.

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