Population

What’s next for Census 2021?

Picture of the online census form

Long gone are the days when census statistics were published in huge printed volumes. Now the Office for National Statistics is making the latest census information as easy as possible to use online so everyone can navigate the breadth and depth of census information and find reliable answers to their questions.  In this post Jen Woolford sets out the variety of ways in which people will be able to access the census statistics they need in coming months. 

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Sociodemographic inequalities of dying by suicide

Reducing the number of people who die by suicide is of paramount importance. Every death from suicide is a tragedy, and behind every statistic is an individual, a family, and a community devastated by their loss. Today we have produced analysis estimating the rates of suicide by sociodemographic characteristics to understand which groups of people are at the highest risk. Here, Isobel Ward explains the research and why it is so important.

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Revolutionising administrative data: a look into the future of population and migration statistics

Crowds of people walking through a busy street

Census 2021 has delivered a wealth of insight over recent months and will soon embark on an innovative new ‘open source’ phase. In addition, the Office for National Statistics is evolving to deliver more frequent, timely and relevant population statistics to better meet user needs. Underpinned by a suite of research and evidence, this year will see a call for views on our ambitious work. Here, Jen Woolford explains what’s coming in 2023. 

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How many people have had COVID-19? The challenge of reinfections

Since the appearance of Omicron variants in December 2021, the number of people being reinfected with COVID-19 has increased markedly. As Leanne Massie explains, this affects our ability to estimate the total number of people who have had COVID-19 at least once.

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How do we measure expected and excess deaths?

Close up image of death certificate

There has been widespread interest in the number of excess deaths across the UK. That is, the difference between the actual number of deaths observed and the number that was expected. But how do you calculate the expected number of deaths? Sarah Caul explains a new cross-UK initiative to take stock of how we calculate expected, and excess, deaths.  

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